22nd Sunday of Ordinary Time – 2nd September 2018

With effect from 1stSeptember the Parish Office opening hours will beTuesday to Friday 9am -1pm


Dear Brothers and Sisters

Just before I went on retreat the report from IICSA (Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse) was published looking at sexual abuse cases at two English schools run by Benedictines of the English Congregation – Downside and Ampleforth. This report makes for difficult reading coming, as it does, hard on the heels of the scandal of the Chilean and Australian bishops ignoring of reports of child abuse by clergy and religious brothers, the conviction of the Bishop of Adelaide, Philip Wilson, for concealing child abuse and a devastating report in Pennsylvania into systemic and widespread abuse of minors by over 300 clergy.  We are familiar with the scandal of the Boston archdiocese too brought to light by the Boston Globe and featured in the film “Spotlight”. We are all too familiar with the scandals that have hit the Church here in England over the last twenty years or so as well.  And you and I could be forgiven for wondering where, or if, it will ever end.

Many have decided that our church is not fit for purpose any longer and have walked away – some to other Christian communities but a large number to nothing and nowhere.  It is hugely distressing for those of us who remain and find ourselves struggling to make sense of it all and asking ourselves what we should do.

Last week’s Gospel reading was also hard-hitting and hard to hear.  On hearing Jesus’ words about “eating and drinking His flesh and blood” many of his followers decided that this was “intolerable” and left him.  It was, as we know extremely difficult language for Jewish people to accept, and Jesus turned to Peter and those who were still with him and asked “What about you?  Are you going to go away too?”  Peter’s answer isn’t exactly a ringing endorsement of things as they stand.  ‘To whom would we go” sounds like a person who wouldgo, who wouldleave, if onlyhe felt there was something better to go to. Except he can’t think of it right now.  But Peter’s next words also reveal the challenge that he faces, and which we too face – “You have the message of eternal life”.  So in essence he is saying ‘I would go but I don’t know where to and in any case you are the one, I believe, who brings this “something” that I’m not sure I can find elsewhere’.

I guess that for many of us, thinking about the scandals facing the Church and the clergy, and reflecting upon the fact that these are scandals largely committed by the clergy against the lay faithful, we too could be forgiven for only staying because there is in fact nowhere else to go.  And somehow we also believe that despite the Church’s brokenness, somehow it does have the “message of eternal life” – even if a somewhat tarnished version of it. We have been brought up to think of the Church as “Holy” as well as Catholic and Apostolic.  At times like these it is hard to think of her as “holy” and it can be also very hard to identify with her as one of her members when the news is so unrelentingly bad.

Of course the difficulties don’t begin and end with the abuse scandals that the Church is facing. There are other contemporary issues that we face of, for example, the role of women in the church where we appear to lag behind secular society where the voice, leadership, expertise and skill of women is increasingly accepted and encouraged.  Pope Francis has called for an end to “clericalism” and many are joining in this call too.  This is a complex area because clericalism isn’t just how the clergy wield their authority and power but also how power and authority is understood in the first place. So we need to see that power, authority and responsibility are shared between clergy and the lay faithful in a far more creative and empowering way – but this seems to be something that is taking ages and ages without much progress.  It’s not really about whether women are in positions of responsibility as such, more about how power and authority are wielded by a predominantly male order within the Church.

Another thing the Church needs to look at is what secular society can teach and share with it rather than the other way round.  For too long the Church has acted as if the traffic was all one-way.  It is, after all, secular society that first condemned the Church for the cover ups, the self monitoring and excusing of abusers; the protection of the “good name” of the Church by silencing the very people who are the victims here, and also for downplaying, or failing to recognise sufficiently the long term mental, physical and spiritual harm done to the abused by abuse from within an organisation that people understood and trusted to be the protector of the marginalised and the weak.

As a priest I too ask myself what to do.  I, of course, realise as perhaps you do too that the vast majority of priests, deacons and religious are hard working, devoted and entirely trustworthy people who love their people dearly and devote their lives to their well being and salvation. But I have to acknowledge that the task of persuading the young to remain, or become a part of our flawed Church, and to take a decisive role in her life is becoming harder and harder. There are the issues raised by science and sociology that question the very basis of the teaching of the Church. There are the “difficult’ teachings of the Church around human sexuality and reproduction that young people, with their preference for independent choices and thinking, find hard to accept. There are the issues around “what the church is for”, “what faith does” that are hard for our young people to see. And on top of this is unrelentingly bad news.

The thing is that the essential message remains clear and constant and, in fact, there is no human institution anywhere that is perfect.  Everything is flawed – the awakening for some people is that this should be also true of the Church which for too long has been seen as a sort of “perfect society” – why?  Because divine.  Yet, like the Word of God in scripture the Church is not only divine but terribly human – subject to the weakness of false ideas and hopes of each successive generation. It is divine because at the heart of the message and life of the Church is Christ but it is also flawed because people like you and me are its members.

This can help us to see that the Church and I are always in need of repentance and renewal. Repentance which in our tradition means “turning back to God” and renewal which means letting go of flawed, out of date and unhelpful models of Church which do not serve our day well. Pope Francis has spent the larger part of his Pontificate attempting to do exactly that.

At the heart of each of us though, myself included, has to be a decision based on faith, not so much in the Church, but on a personal faith in the person of Jesus who is the Lord of my life and who strengthens me each day, and who is beside me each day to heal me and give me life.  Quite literally then, we may only be able to say with St Peter, “Lord, to whom shall we go?” as a kind of makeshift, tentative, commitment to sticking with it and making the best of it because we feel that in the Church we can find the grace of the sacraments to heal us, forgive us and strengthen us and we also know that there is so much to be done to bring that grace to the world.  Perhaps the best way of countering the disillusionment is to become more deeply involved in practical ways in serving, if you like, the Gospel even if we cannot serve the Church as she is.

Please join me in praying for the life of the Church; for renewal and repentance from the top to the bottom and for a change for the better.

With my love and best wishes Fr David


How Holy this Feast

How holy this feast in which Christ is our food: his passion is recalled, His grace fills our hearts, and we receive a pledge of the glory to come.

Next week Catholics from around the country will be gathering in Liverpool to celebrate the Eucharistic Congress.  This is the first such congress for over a hundred years and some of our own parishioners have made their way to Liverpool to be a part of the events.  We can join them spiritually by participating in some devotions here in our parish that are aimed at deepening our appreciation of the Eucharist which lies at the heart of our life as Catholics.  On this page are a few snippets (only) of what the Eucharist means in the life of the Church.  You might use these words and thoughts to prepare yourself for Mass and for the extra devotions we will have over the next weekend.

Events we have planned:

  • Friday after Mass – Holy Hour with Meditation on the Eucharist – Mass 10am. Holy Hour – 10.30 – 11.30am
    Confessions throughout Holy Hour
  • Saturday after Mass – Holy Hour with Meditation on the Eucharist – Mass 10am. Holy Hour – 10.30 – 11.30am
    Confessions throughout Holy Hour
  • Sunday at 5pm – – Holy Hour with Meditation on the Eucharist and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament

In the Liturgy we are called to respond both individually and corporately, as the Body of Christ. When we say ‘Amen’ as we receive Communion it is both a statement of personal faith and (literally) an act of Communion, communion with the whole Church. In a similar way prayer before the Blessed Sacrament is personal prayer and prayer with the Church. More than that the gift of this prayer is to help us participate in Mass more deeply, to be more deeply in communion. 

From the Encyclical of Pope Francis Evangelii Gaudium

The Church is called to be the house of the Father, with doors always wide open. One concrete sign of such openness is that our church doors should always be open, so that if someone, moved by the Spirit, comes there looking for God, he or she will not find a closed door. There are other doors that should not be closed either. Everyone can share in some way in the life of the Church; everyone can be part of the community, nor should the doors of the sacraments be closed for simply any reason. This is especially true of the sacrament which is itself ‘the door’: baptism. The Eucharist, although it is the fullness of sacramental life, is not a prize for the perfect but a powerful medicine and nourishment for the weak. These convictions have pastoral consequences that we are called to consider with prudence and boldness. Frequently, we act as arbiters of grace rather than its facilitators. But the Church is not a tollhouse; it is the house of the Father, where there is a place for everyone, with all their problems. [47] 

Preparation

  • Think about the various aspects of parish life you are involved in and what you would want to pray for each.
  • Think of people at Sunday Mass who you only know by sight or slightly; how do they reveal Christ’s presence to you?

Think about those in your circle of family, friends and acquaintances and what you hope for them

Prayerfrom the Didache

We thank you, Father, for the holy vine of David, your servant, which you have revealed through Jesus, your Son. Praise to you now and evermore!

We thank you, Father, for the life and the knowledge that you have revealed through Jesus, your Son.
Praise to you now and evermore!

Just as this bread that we break was once distributed on a hillside and its fragments gathered so as not to lose any, so let your Church be gathered from the farthest parts of the earth into your Kingdom.
Praise to you now and evermore!

Because yours are the glory and the power forever. Praise to you now and evermore!

We thank you, holy Father, for your holy name that dwells in our hearts. Praise to you now and evermore!

For the knowledge, the faith, and the immortality that you have revealed to us through Jesus, your Son. Praise to you now and evermore!

It is you, all-powerful Master, who created the universe in praise of your name.
Praise to you now and evermore!

You give food and drink to the children of men; but to us you give the grace of a spiritual food, of a drink for eternal life through Jesus, your Son.
Praise to you now and evermore!

Above all, we thank you for your power.
Praise to you now and evermore!

Remember, Lord, your Church, to deliver it from every evil, and to make it perfect in your love.
Praise to you now and evermore!

Gather together from the four winds this sanctified Church into the kingdom that you have prepared. Praise to you now and evermore!

Come, Lord, and let this world pass! —Amen. Hosanna to the house of David! —Amen.

Let him who is holy come! —Amen.

Let him who is not, repent! —Amen.

Maranatha (Come, Lord)! —Amen.


We have decided to change the format of the weekly newsletter with effect from October.   On the first weekend of October we will publish a bumper newsletter full of information for the coming month which will be relevant all month.  At the Masses we will publish a one-page newsletter of Mass information.  The weekly e-newsletter will continue.   We ask that if you have events or notices that you would like advertised that you send these to the office in plenty of time for the first bumper newsletter of the month.


Inclusion Festival Arundel & Brighton– Everyone is welcome!

If you have not yet registered for ifab there is still time to do so! Come and join us at St Wilfrid’s School, RH11 8PG, Crawley on Sunday 16th September from 11am onwards to celebrate the value of each person and the diversity in our diocese.  There are workshops in the morning and the day will conclude with Bishop Richard celebrating Mass with everyone at 14.30.  Don’t forget to bring your picnic.

Just go to: https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/ifab2018 to register or use your phone.  Further Information: contact Rosie Read on rosie.read@dabnet.org  or 01293 651161.


Day with Mary on September 15th, the feast of Our Lady of Sorrows. This Apostolate encourages devotion to Our Lady of Fatima. The event will include Mass and two talks with Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament and processions and recitation of the Rosary. Fr John Seddon OSB will be the main Celebrant. 10.00 am -4.30 pm. Please bring a packed lunch. Tea and Coffee is provided. An extensive selection of devotional items will be on sale.   Fr John Seddon OSB


Pokot News

Fr David Conway at the Barpello Mission sent me this message about a project he had started to help the community in a remote part of his Mission area.

“The people of Nasorot, Naudo, Nadome and Akwichatis have no water resource. Women walk for up to 20Kms daily to secure enough water for Bathing, Cooking etc. We opted to construct a water pan, as it is known that a borehole may be salty. We had not planned for this cost, that is why we are asking for any contribution.”
The total cost of the project amounts to some five and a half million Kenyan Shillings (over £42,000).  The pan will provide water for domestic purposes, for livestock and with any surplus for kitchen gardens. The estimated number of livestock in the area to be served by the water pan is 8,000 sheep and goats; 2,000 cattle; 600 camels and 2,000 donkeys. Fr Conway has secured a grant of Euros 40,000 from an Irish charity, has promised to find Ksh 330,000 from local contributions, but still needed some £6,000 for the project to proceed. I circulated news of the project to members of the Pound a Week Group whose email addresses I have and I am delighted to tell you that we now have donations for the full £6,000. I shall be sending the money, along with other donations to Fr Conway early next month. From Eugene McGivern


Missio Red BoxesITheteam of parish promoters would like to collect the monies from the Red Boxes during September. Most box holders should be contacted by their promoter direct but if you are not, could you leave your box in the Sacristy at Bramley or Cranleigh. Please ensure your name is on the bottom of your box for identification. Many thanks for your support. Fran Pickett. Tel. 01483 276614 Email nickpickett1948@gmail.com”


Hi, My name is Amelia Schumacher and I am a former pupil at St Cuthbert Maybe and I am currently in Year 13 at St Peters. I am a reliable and responsible 17 year old available for babysitting. Call or text me on 07582 288824.


You are invited to a community tea party with tea sandwiches and cake on Saturday 1stSeptember from 3-5pm at St Nicolas Church Rooms, Church Lane, Cranleigh.   Entertainment by Emilee Lucia.  RSVP to 01483 274376.  Lifts can be arranged and everyone is welcome.


ADORE (Alton Day Of REnewal) – Saturday 22nd September 11.00-4.00

You are warmly welcome to a mini-retreat day (or morning/afternoon) of spiritual refreshment and renewal, focussing on Renewal and Mission. At Alton School, Anstey Lane, Alton GU34 2NG. 11.00am Rosary; 11.30am Mass; 12.15 Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament; 1.00pm Shared lunch (please bring finger food to share); 2.00pm Praise & Worship; 2.30 Talk “New sight for the blind – Mission and healing.” – Pauline Edwards and Fr Laurence Brassill of Little Way Healing Ministries; 3.30 Prayer for healing. We end about 4pm.

There is no need to register in advance, and no charge (though a collection will be taken to cover costs). For more information and directions, see poster or website: www.altonrenewal.com Or telephone Alastair Emblem on 01252 714809.   Following month’s meeting: 27th October. “The Spirit has sent me” – Fr John Seddon

St Augustine’s Abbey, Chilworth,  Learn about Catholicism


THE BENEDICTINE MONKS of St Augustine’s Abbey, Chilworth warmly invite anyone interested to a presentation on ‘Catholicism – a journey to the heart of the faith’,by the acclaimed author and speaker Bishop Barron. One of the ten episodes of the series will be shown consecutively over a period of ten months, beginning on Saturday 22 September 2018, then 20 October, 24 November and 15 December. Dates for January onwards will be publicised depending on demand.

These Chilworth Abbey Study Days will be given by Benedictine monk Fr John Seddon OSB, who will contextualise each episode and then teach about the episode’s subject matter after lunch.

The day begins with Mass at 9am, followed by coffee. A brief introduction will precede the showing of the film. Questions will follow, then Midday prayer and lunch. Episode 1 deals with God’s incarnation in Jesus Christ. After lunch there will be teaching to clarify further the film’s theme. The Day concludes at 4 pm. Come to part, or all of the day, as it suits you. Bring a packed lunch and a friend. Tea and coffee is provided. Free to attend, no need to book.  Find out more at http://www.chilworthbenedictines.com/  St Augustine’s Abbey, Sample Oak Lane, Chilworth, Guildford, Surrey GU4 8QR


Apostleship of the Sea invites you to a Mass in honour of our patron Stella Maris, Our Lady Star of the Sea.Come pray for the work of Apostleship of the Sea and for seafarers on Wednesday, September 12th, at 11am, in Arundel Cathedral, London Road, Arundel, West Sussex, BN18 9AY. Monsignor B Richard Madders will celebrate Mass, followed by a reception. All invited. Please RSVP by email tosalvina@apostleshipofthesea.org.uk
www.apostleshipofthesea.org.uk

21st Sunday of Ordinary Time – 26th August 2018

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Unknown.jpegPokot News

Fr David Conway at the Barpello Mission sent me this message about a project he had started to help  the community in a remote part of his Mission area.

“The people of Nasorot, Naudo, Nadome and Akwichatis have no water resource. Women walk for up to 20Kms daily to secure enough water for Bathing, Cooking etc. We opted to construct  a water pan, as it is known that a borehole may be salty. We had not planned for this cost, that is why we are asking for any contribution.”

The total cost of the project amounts to some  five and a half million Kenyan Shillings (over £42,000).  The pan will provide water for domestic purposes, for livestock and with any surplus for kitchen gardens. The estimated number of livestock in the area to be served by the water pan is 8,000 sheep and goats; 2,000 cattle; 600 camels and 2,000 donkeys. Fr Conway has secured a grant of Euros 40,000 from an Irish charity, has promised to find Ksh 330,000 from local contributions, but still needed some £6,000 for the project to proceed. I circulated news of the project to members of the Pound a Week Group  whose email addresses I have and I am delighted to tell you that we now have donations for the full £6,000. I shall be sending the money, along with other donations to Fr Conway early next month.

Eugene McGivern at emcgivern@btinternet.com or 01483-893379.

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Congratulations to the 300 club winners for August J Federer, D Barry and J Dobbe.

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Apostleship of the Sea invites you to a Mass in honour of our patron Stella Maris, Our Lady Star of the Sea. Come pray for the work of Apostleship of the Sea and for seafarers on Wednesday, September 12th, at 11am, in Arundel Cathedral, London Road, Arundel, West Sussex, BN18 9AY. Monsignor B Richard Madders will celebrate Mass, followed by a reception. All invited.Please RSVP by email to salvina@apostleshipofthesea.org.uk
www.apostleshipofthesea.org.uk

19th Sunday in Ordinary Time

The Last Supper Jesus breaks the bread.
Times of Mass and Devotions
Sat 11th Cranleigh 10.00am Mass – St Clare Albert Morris (RIP)
19th Sunday of Ordinary Time
Sat 11th Cranleigh 6.00pm Vigil Mass Helen Tyson [RIP}
Sun 12th Bramley

Cranleigh

9.00am

11.00am

Sung Mass

Sung Mass

People of the Parish

Adoremus Congress

Tues 14th Bramley 10.00am Mass – St Maximilian Kolbe Prisoners of Conscience
Wed 15th Cranleigh

Bramley

10.00am

8.00pm

Mass – The Assumption of the BVM Pro Populo

The Dying

Thurs 16th Bramley 10.00am Mass – feria Bp Richard’s Ints
Fri 17th Cranleigh 10.00am Mass – feria Pope Francis’ Ints
20th Sunday of Ordinary Time
Sat 18th Cranleigh 6.00pm Vigil Mass Fergal Hough (RIP)
Sun 19th Bramley

Cranleigh

9.00am

11.00am

Sung Mass

Parish Mass

People of the Parish

 

The Divine Office – 20 minutes before weekday Masses.
Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament – 1 hour before weekday masses

Confessions – Saturday after mass and 5pm, Wednesday at 6pm, Thursday at 10.30am or by appointment at any time

Parish Prayer Group – 2nd & 4th Monday 9.15am and Thursday at 8pm – see website or notice board for details

Dear Brothers and Sisters
Marilyn Vincent has just returned from Lourdes with the Diocesan Pilgrims and so I asked her if she could write something for the newsletter of that experience.  As you can see she speaks of a wonderful time which was uplifting for her (and many others) because of the vibrancy of the young people present not despite them.  I am heartily encouraged by this news and ask you all to find every way possible to encourage our young people in their pilgrimages of faith to remain faithful, awake to the gospel of life, earnest in their search for truth and beauty, aware of the poor and marginalised and prepared to help us move into the future with hope.  Here is what Marilyn had to say – written in her own words and completely unabridged or edited in any way.

Having just returned from my first visit to Lourdes, I am left with the most memorable and eye-opening impressions of today’s ‘young people’. To say I was amazed at this wonderful, caring and committed band of youngsters, ranging in ages from early to late teens, is truly an understatement. Their genuine, heartfelt consideration of the disabled, sick and elderly was beyond all my expectations.

Apropos Father David’s message in last week’s Newsletter, if the Catholic Church is in the hands of these wonderful young people, then we truly have no need to worry! They stood before us, hundreds of us, proclaiming their Faith, without hesitation or embarrassment, before going out on the town, to socialise, dance, rap, as all teenagers do. Nothing pious about this lot!

In his final message to the red shirts in particular, Bishop Richard, set them all a task……” Go back to your Parishes, be brave, stand up and tell them what you have told us today”.

                                       It was enlightening!

                                       Marilyn VINCENT 

Of course, Lourdes is a very special place, and the experience of a diocesan pilgrimage a privileged one, but what this shows us is that our young people love to be involved, valued, accepted in their own terms, and appreciated. We just have to find a way to help them practise their faith here at home and to bring that energy and enthusiasm which Marilyn found so enchanting and memorable into our parish setting.

This is undoubtedly one of the key questions that the new Mission Team will be looking at in the very near future but perhaps you have something to offer – an opinion backed up by a promise of action?  Experience in youth music, dance, culture?  An ability to communicate with the young in a non-patronising and life giving way?  For us to become a truly great parish we need contributions from all the talents and no one should be left behind.

With my love and prayer, as always.

Fr David

Other news…


Fully escorted Pilgrimage to Knock Shrine, Ireland, 17th September 2018.  £649.00 per person sharing.  Price includes flight with 10kg hand luggage, all taxes, luxury transfers, 4 nights’ in Knock House Hotel with full Irish Breakfast each morning and 4 Course Dinner each evening.  All entertainment, excursions and guided tours included.  Wheelchair accessible rooms in the hotel.  Limited single rooms at supplement of £100.  Groups and Individual bookings welcome.   Contact Patricia on 01268 762 278 or 07740 175557 or email knockpilgrimages@gmail.com.  Knock Pilgrimages is a member of the Travel Trust Association and is fully protected by ATOL T7613.

Would you like to be one of Cedar Courts Care Home Good Companions? TheCranleigh care home’s multi award winning activities team is looking for volunteers to help out on its Dementia Floor in the mornings from 9.30 till 12.30 on any day of the week.  We are looking for kind, caring volunteers with a keen sense of fun to sit and chat with our first Floor Residents and help out with activities and be jolly good company.  You will be given a free DBS check and some short training on line training at the home and free lunch in our bistro at 12.30 if you wanted it.  Any hours you could give would be greatly appreciated so event if you couldn’t’ do all 9.30 – 12.30 don’t worry. Please contact Michael & Kaye on 01483 275191 or email activities.cedarcourt@outlook.com.

Inclusion Festival Arundel & Brighton

“To celebrate the value of each person and the diversity in our diocese”
Sunday 16thSeptember 2018 at St Wilfrid’s School, Crawley, RH11 8PG. Doors Open 11 am.
Opportunities for different forms of prayer

  • Lectio Divina
  • Learning Sign Language
  • BYO Picnic Lunch – tea, coffee, soft drinks available
  • Mass with Bishop Richard at 2.30 pm.
    All Welcome!
    https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/ifab2018   or use your phone
    Parents/Carers are responsible for their Children/Vulnerable Adults at all times.Enquiries to Margaret Fraher, Diocesan Inclusion Adviser, at margaret.fraher@dabnet.org  01293 651196

Pokot News from Eugene McGivern

Fr Conway is back in Barpello from his sabbatical and sent me the following message.

“The three cows sponsored by the funds your Group obtained from the Charitable Trust are doing well. Each has a calf, bringing our total Special Herd to six. We are yet to buy the bull. We delayed in buying the bull until the cows had calved so that genes don’t get mixed-up!!!!  While the school was on holiday there was plenty of milk in the community and in the dispensary. The discretionary £2,015.00 (KShs 266,980) that you sent to me last month will be used to help some students get uniforms. Uniforms can be expensive especially for Form I. It is a huge burden on some families. The money will be used for the poor, that I can guarantee. Many thanks to the Pound a Week Group for your ongoing generosity & great support.”
Fr Sean McGovern at the Rotu Mission tells me that from his discretionary amount  he set aside £1,000 for the children’s breakfasts; £500 he put into his Education Fund; and the balance of £515 will be used for the school health unit and general maintenance of the school and the Mission. He has asked me to convey his warmest thanks to all the Group for our support. Eugene McGivern at emcgivern@btinternet.com or 01483-893379


Pope Francis said ‘It is not enough to say we are Christians. We must live the faith, not only with our words, but with our actions.’ There are many ways to put our faith into action and offering your time to CAFOD is one of them. CAFOD is the official Catholic aid agency for England and Wales, and part of Caritas International. They are currently looking for people across the area who would help out with office tasks or media/social media related work in their local office in nearby Wonersh. Alternatively, they would also be interested in hearing from you if you are interested in raising awareness of their work and the needs of the world in the parish, in local schools or with our local MP.
If you can make a difference or if you know of anybody who might be interested, contact the local CAFOD office as soon as possible. Tel: 01483 898866
email:arundelandbrighton@cafod.org.uk


ADORE (Alton Day Of REnewal) – Saturday 18th August 11.00-4.00

You are warmly welcome to a mini-retreat day (or morning/afternoon) of spiritual refreshment and renewal, focussing on Renewal and Mission. At Alton School, Anstey Lane, Alton GU34 2NG. 11.00am Rosary; 11.30am Mass; 12.15 Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament; 1.00pm Shared lunch (please bring finger food to share); 2.00pm Praise & Worship; 2.30 Talk “The Church exists to evangelise” – Fr Mark Hogan; 3.30 Prayer for healing. We end about 4pm.

There is no need to register in advance, and no charge (though a collection will be taken to cover costs). For more information and directions, see poster or website: www.altonrenewal.com Or telephone Alastair Emblem on 01252 714809.
Following month’s meeting: 22nd September – “New Sight for the Blind – Mission and healing” with Pauline Edwards and Fr Laurence Brassill

Ministers and Readers this weekend…

Rota Vigil Mass 9 – Bramley 11 – Cranleigh
Welcomers R & O Bond J Mayer

A Streeter

S Allaway & family
1st Reading D Meech M Vincent K Mantle
2nd Reading C Houston P Gloyens C Greenwood
EMHC R Sharpe

J Finlayson

J Raven

J Penson

D Penson

C Wyllie

P O Brien

V Milner

S Appleyard

K Swindells

G Brand

L Collins

M Evans

R Millar

P Scully

The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary

This lovely feast falls this week, on Wednesday.  It is a “holyday of obligation” as Sundays are – in other words when Catholics are expected to attend a celebration of Holy Mass.  We have two opportunities to attend Mass – 10am at Cranleigh and 8pm at Bramley.  We are also lucky enough to have an organist for the 8pm service so this will be sung – and with some choir who aren’t away on holiday also present.

I wonder whether you know the background of this feast and why it is such an important one? Why should you attend a “holyday” – isn’t going to Church on a Sunday enough?  Can’t we overdo the religiosity bit?

I have written on this before but it’s worth having another stab at it.  The Church celebrates the sacraments in which Divine grace is imparted through sacramental signs such as water, wine, oil, and bread. In this way God’s grace is mediated to the faithful in order to sanctify them and build up their lives in holiness. The sacraments also help us through “everyday” life by strengthening us to face whatever life throws at us and to celebrate all the good things of life too.

Although the Church’s Year isn’t itself a sacrament it is intimately connected with the life of Jesus Christ as he lived it. Keeping the feasts of the Lord helps us to enter into the “mystery” of God by participating in Jesus incarnation, passion, death and resurrection.  We do this by celebrating Christmas and Easter.  Throughout the year there are other celebrations which focus on other aspects of the Lord’s life – his Transfiguration, Ascension, Baptism etc.  These help us to enter into the wholeness of the Lord’s life and experience, even if remotely perhaps, the spiritual power of these events in our own lives.

The Church also celebrates the lives of the Saints – most often keeping the day they died in this life, and entered into new life, as a special feast.  As they were men and women who faced exactly the same challenges that we do, and who came through strong in faith and charity, remembering them and learning about them and their part in history can help us to be strong in faith too – and to persevere when times are hard, or confusing, or our faith grows weak.

Foremost among the saints is Jesus’ own Mother Mary – the Blessed Virgin.  We are told by St Luke that she is “blessed among women” – and we know from other new testament accounts that she had a special place in the life of the early church.  St John, according to custom and tradition, took her into his own home after the Crucifixion and treated her as his own mother.

It had long been the tradition of the faithful, though never formally defined as such, that Mary, in the moment of her death was carried away body and soul into heaven.  In this she fulfilled the hope and desire of all Christians that this life is not the last word, the full story, of our lives.  Our hope is that we shall see God face to face in heaven and, one day, be resurrected body and soul when God creates a new heaven and a new earth. In this regard Mary is a kind of “first fruits” for all believers in what God holds out for us.  Life – and life in abundance.  Because Mary is fully human, like you and me, this Assumption of Mary into heaven holds out the hope that “ordinary” Christians such as you and I will, one day, be united with Jesus, Mary, Joseph and all the saints in heaven.

Other feasts – Maximillian Kolbe – Tuesday

Maximilian Kolbe was born on 8 January1894 in Zduńska Wola, in the Kingdom of Poland, which was a part of the Russian Empire, the second son of weaver Julius Kolbe and midwife Maria Dąbrowska. His father was an ethnic German and his mother was Polish. He had four brothers. Shortly after his birth, his family moved to Pabianice.

Kolbe’s life was strongly influenced in 1906 by a vision of the Virgin Mary he said he had as a child. He later described this incident:

That night I asked the Mother of God what was to become of me. Then she came to me holding two crowns, one white, the other red. She asked me if I was willing to accept either of these crowns. The white one meant that I should persevere in purity, and the red that I should become a martyr. I said that I would accept them both.

In 1918 Kolbe was ordained a priest having entered the Franciscan order in 1907.  He was part of a group who published pamphlets often critical of the Nazi authoritiesand was eventually arrested and sent to Auschwitz.  Continuing to act as a priest, Kolbe was subjected to violent harassment, including beating and lashings, and once had to be smuggled to a prison hospital by friendly inmates. At the end of July 1941, ten prisoners disappeared from the camp, prompting SS-Hauptsturmführer Karl Fritzsch, the deputy camp commander, to pick 10 men to be starved to death in an underground bunker to deter further escape attempts. When one of the selected men, Franciszek Gajowniczek, cried out, “My wife! My children!”, Kolbe volunteered to take his place.

According to an eye witness, an assistant janitor at that time, in his prison cell, Kolbe led the prisoners in prayer to Our Lady. Each time the guards checked on him, he was standing or kneeling in the middle of the cell and looking calmly at those who entered. After two weeks of dehydration and starvation, only Kolbe remained alive. “The guards wanted the bunker emptied, so they gave Kolbe a lethal injection of carbolic acid. Kolbe is said to have raised his left arm and calmly waited for the deadly injection. He died on August 14. His remains were cremated on 15 August, the feast day of the Assumption of Mary.

Source : Wikipedia

18th Sunday of Ordinary Time

Dear Brothers and Sisters

There is an interesting verse in the psalm for this Sunday that goes:

The things we have heard and understood,

the things our fathers have told us,

we will tell to the next generation:

the glories of the Lord and his might.

I find this interesting for a number of reasons. The first is that it tells us that our faith is handed on – “we will tell to the next generation.”  This is, in fact, the meaning of the word “Tradition.” Tradition is what is “handed on.” It is handed on because the current owners, or users, have found it to be of value and worth, something that, it is hoped, will also be of value and worth to the next generation.  Tradition used to be something that was highly prized – consider for a moment traditional dress in places like Wales or Scotland. The ‘tradition’ demarcated those for whom it was important, cultural even, from those outside, who looked on, and sometimes, envied what they saw and heard.

The Catholic faith is one of those things that is founded on ‘tradition’ – what is handed on.  Through the long years of persecution Catholics clung on to the traditions that made them who they were – the Mass, the Real Presence of Jesus in the Eucharist, the Sacraments, the Papacy, priesthood and religious life, genuflecting on entering or leaving a church, bowing, crossing oneself in blessing, a spirit of social service to the poor and marginalised and so on.  There are many more, I know.

All that has come down to us has been handed on from the time of the Apostles until now.  Each generation has to ask itself why this, or this, is important and how it should be used today.

I am aware, because it is true for me too with my own children that many of you find the handing on of tradition to your families a huge burden and question.  The present generation which no longer defers to authority, or the elder generation no longer automatically assumes that what they are told and shown by their parents, teachers, priests etc are to be believed without question. In fact there is a lively spirit of doubt and enquiry abroad which actually questions almost everything that is handed on.  Why is this, or that, so important?  Why should I dress like this, or that?  Why should I accept everything, or even anything the Church teaches just because it says so?

All this makes for tension and, I guess, fear and anxiety.  How do we help our children, the next generation, understand what we have valued and understood?

Every family will attempt this difficult question according to their own make up and character but, perhaps, what is needed above all is a sense that we really do value certain things more than other things. We try to live by our values and uphold those things we have come to prize and which have shaped our lives and given meaning to them.  Perhaps instead of telling the next generation we need to show the next generation. Show them that our values give shape and a certain depth to our own lives which we care enough about to want to pass onto our children and grandchildren.  I struggle.  I know you do too.  But perhaps its worth the struggle.  N’est pas?

With my love and prayers.  Fr David.

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Office Opening Hours

The Parish Office will be closed 6thto 12thAugust.

During the School Holidays Tracy will be in the office each Tuesday, Thursday and Friday of the week 9-12am.

Messages can be left on voicemail or email for response during working hours.

Thank you.

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Would you consider renting a room toa mature Italian lady in her thirties who speaks English and is studying for further CBT qualifications.  She has a mental health background with experience of working with children and adults.  She is currently supporting an older lady living in Cranleigh and is looking for affordable rented accommodation.  This could be through an arrangement with someone who may have space living in a larger house who would like a mature student for a rented situation.  Please contact Tracy in the office in the first instance.

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You are warmly invited to the next Chilworth Day of Praise and Healing, aroundthe theme ‘Feed my Sheep’, given by Rev. Fr Anthony Meredith. on Sat, 18th of August, 2018. The day begins with Mass at 10.20 am. Two talks will divide the day, with refreshments and lunch, the Divine Mercy Devotion, with Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament, concluding with the Sacrament of Healing and departures at 4.20 pm. Come to part, or all of the day, as it suits you. Bring a packed lunch, and, if you can, a friend. Tea and coffee is provided. St Augustine’s Abbey, Sample Oak Lane, Chilworth, Near Guildford. GU4 8QR   Online information:www.chilworthbenedictines.com

images.jpegFully escorted Pilgrimage to Knock Shrine, Ireland, 17th September 2018.  £649.00 per person sharing.  Price includes flight with 10kg hand luggage, all taxes, luxury transfers, 4 nights’ in Knock House Hotel with full Irish Breakfast each morning and 4 Course Dinner each evening.  All entertainment, excursions and guided tours included.  Wheelchair accessible rooms in the hotel.  Limited single rooms at supplement of £100.  Groups and Individual bookings welcome.   Contact Patricia on 01268 762 278 or 07740 175557 or email knockpilgrimages@gmail.com.  Knock Pilgrimages is a member of the Travel Trust Association and is fully protected by ATOL T7613.

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Would you like to be one of Cedar Courts Care Home Good Companions?  TheCranleigh care home’s multi award winning activities team is looking for volunteers to help out on its Dementia Floor in the mornings from 9.30 till 12.30 on any day of the week.  We are looking for kind, caring volunteers with a keen sense of fun to sit and chat with our first Floor Residents and help out with activities and be jolly good company.  You will be given a free DBS check and some short training on line training at the home and free lunch in our bistro at 12.30 if you wanted it.   Any hours you could give would be greatly appreciated so event if you couldn’t’ do all 9.30 – 12.30 don’t worry.  Please contact Michael & Kaye on 01483 275191 or email activities.cedarcourt@outlook.com.

ADORE-logo-COL.png ADORE (Alton Day Of REnewal) – Saturday 18th August 11.00-4.00

You are warmly welcome to a mini-retreat day (or morning/afternoon) of spiritual refreshment and renewal, focussing on Renewal and Mission. At Alton School, Anstey Lane, Alton GU34 2NG. 11.00am Rosary; 11.30am Mass; 12.15 Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament; 1.00pm Shared lunch (please bring finger food to share); 2.00pm Praise & Worship; 2.30 Talk “The Church exists to evangelise” – Fr Mark Hogan; 3.30 Prayer for healing. We end about 4pm.

There is no need to register in advance, and no charge (though a collection will be taken to cover costs). For more information and directions, see poster or website: www.altonrenewal.com Or telephone Alastair Emblem on 01252 714809.
Following month’s meeting: 22nd September – “New Sight for the Blind – Mission and healing” with Pauline Edwards and Fr Laurence Brassill

91aed9_e7a884b5db2a46eca3ff909a8d5791c6~mv2.pngInclusion Festival Arundel & Brighton

“To celebrate the value of each person and the diversity in our diocese”

Sunday 16thSeptember 2018 at St Wilfrid’s School, Crawley, RH11 8PG. 

Doors Open 11 am.

Opportunities for different forms of prayer

  • Lectio Divina
  • Learning Sign Language
  • BYO Picnic Lunch – tea, coffee, soft drinks available
  • Mass with Bishop Richard at 2.30 pm.

All Welcome!

https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/ifab2018   or use your phone

Parents/Carers are responsible for their Children/Vulnerable Adults at all times.Enquiries to Margaret Fraher, Diocesan Inclusion Adviser, at margaret.fraher@dabnet.org  01293 651196

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Our Mission is “Connecting the Community”

Our purpose is to improve community wellbeing by active relationships with providers of services; signposting and coordinating their accessibility by the community. We will improve the life experience and well-being of the people of Cranleigh, Ewhurst and adjacent hamlets by reducing gaps and duplication of support.

We support community projects that make a positive difference to the lives of local people.

Following extensive engagement with the community loneliness has been identified as a key issue. We aim to identify and facilitate the reduction of isolation and loneliness, working alongside existing organisations and groups, large and small.

How and why do individuals become lonely and isolated in a place like this?

Bereavement or relationship breakdown

Children grown up and moved away

Being in poor health or living with restricted mobility

Lone working, retirement, redundancy or significant life change

Care workers and shift-workers who lack the time for themselves

Re-location to this area or being single with no immediate social network or family connections

How can we help you?

We have a group of volunteers who have a good understanding of contacts and facilities in the community locally and who can coordinate introductions.

Our volunteers will be available on the telephone to talk you through some key issues and help you feel connected and link you to further help within the community.

Our website is www.smartcranleigh.org. This will provide you with information on who, where and what we do.

Current activities underway

Intergenerational activities bring together older individuals in care homes with young preschool children and their carers. Smart Cranleigh is working with Cedar Court and Knowle Park care homes, the Cranleigh History society and Cranleigh Scouts

SMART Cranleigh is a not for profit Community Interest Company (CIC) based in Cranleigh and run by volunteers comprising family carers and qualified professionals who live and work with people of all ages in the community. Emailinfo@smartcranleigh.org

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VACANCY Smart Cranleigh – Community Manager (part/time)

Title : Community Manager Smart Cranleigh

Purpose: To administer, develop and signpost activities in Cranleigh and Ewhurst which improve the wellbeing of the local community and deliver the Mission of Smart Cranleigh

Reports to Chairman of Smart Cranleigh Steering Group

Hours of work – Part time (50%) five mornings per week (or equivalent); salary range £22-24,000 pro rata

Activity: Welcoming of the public enquiring of Smart Cranleigh mission and purpose

Network and partner with health, social care, local government, charitable and other social enterprise providers in the local community

Identify people or groups in need in accordance with steering group priorities

Add and maintain content to website and community calendar and social media

Lead income generation from calendar and directory

Support applications for fundraising

Coordinate community projects delivered through volunteers or third parties

Report activity to steering Group monthly; plan forward quarterly

Maintain database contact with partners and clients

Establish and maintain links with local providers and facilitate communication between them

Maintain record of outcomes and projects for report to funders .  Manage access and maintain security at the Smart Cranleigh Drop In Centre

Person specification:  Self-starter with a friendly welcoming personality. Collaborator and relationship builder with local organisations.  Organiser of multiple strands of project activity.  Well organised with good office administrative skills.  Leader and motivator of volunteers.  Competent web user with MS office and database IT skills. Innovator who seeks constructive solutions to complex issues.  Able to work independently and also guide and train volunteers.  Flexible, reliable, team worker.